Vertical Specialization

Vertical Specialization

A management style in which one manager has authority over another. For example, one manager may be assigned to human resources, a second to operations, and a third to accounting, but all three must answer to the company president. See also: Horizontal Specialization.
References in periodicals archive ?
He was of the view that trade complementarities can be developed in the region if the countries in the region are able to achieve vertical specialization through production sharing arrangements.
I then examine whether the rise of vertical specialization (VS) trade, trade in goods incorporating traded inputs, is a quantitatively important source of increasing trade volatility.
Vertical specialization and trade surplus in China.
Our robust, feature rich platforms are fully integrated and designed to support M2M vertical specialization for both customized solutions to enterprise and turnkey solutions for distribution.
Jive Alliance Partners include large global management consultants that provide strategic advisory, change management, custom services, products and solutions on the Jive platform including industry or vertical specialization.
Manufacturing trade and vertical specialization trade, which can be defined as trade in goods that incorporate imported inputs, have both grown rapidly since the 1960s.
The third part turns to the case for aggregation problems and the implications of vertical specialization within industries.
They typically include staff functions such as human resources, finance and accounting, and contact centers or vertical specialization such as insurance claims processing or banking payments.
According to WTO, models used to generate certain gloom and doom estimates do not account for the textile and apparel industry's tendency towards vertical specialization nor do they consider geographic fragmentation of production processes.
Consistent with recent theory, these results suggest that vertical specialization within multinati onal firms rises as trade barriers between countries fall and as factor-price differences between countries widen.
Irwin very correctly notes that this share has been inflated by an increase in the use of vertical specialization (intra-industry trade)--a fact very often neglected by careless commentators on globalization.
In this article, we shed light on the globalization of international production and trade by demonstrating the increasingly important role vertical specialization plays in international trade.