Versailles Treaty


Also found in: Dictionary, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.
Related to Versailles Treaty: World War 1

Versailles Treaty

A 1919 treaty that solemnized the end of World War I. It required Germany, Austria, and Hungary to accept responsibility for causing the war and Germany to pay heavy reparations to the victorious powers. While some scholars disagree, others believe these reparations contributed to Germany's hyperinflation in the early 1920s. In any case, the reparations were humiliating and financially damaging for Germany, which did not make the final payment until 2010.
References in periodicals archive ?
Arguably, a more balanced Versailles treaty would have resulted in German domestic theatre that could have rebuffed Nazi advances.
Moreover, Wilson's utter refusal to compromise over the Versailles Treaty sounds like nothing in politics today so much as Tea Party intransigence.
After the Versailles Treaty, Rheinmetall's ordnance and munitions department was dismantled in accordance with Articles 168 and 169 of the treaty.
Spicer cites, for example, the instance of a certain Father Anton Heuberger of Hizhofen, a "latent anti-Semite" who rejected the Versailles Treaty and looked forward to a patriotic destiny of greatness for Germany.
This may have been inspired by the ambiguous nature of the region in which he lived--in 1919 the Versailles Treaty gave the region south of Schleswig to Denmark, obliging Nolde to become a Danish citizen.
Long before he had denounced the Versailles Treaty inflicted on Germany at the C end of World War 1, that reduced Germany to being an economic pigmy, a policy that propelled Hitler to the heights of power.
No lesser issue would have brought French, German and Belgian women together in friendship in those days when the Versailles treaty was being completed.
Morgan, was named by President Woodrow Wilson to help negotiate the Versailles Treaty after World War I.
He encouraged the victors to offer economic help, to feed the hungry, and to rehabilitate devastated countries in order to prevent the failures of the Versailles Treaty after World War I.
The head in the sand response (epitomized by Ward Churchill) that argues, in essence, that because America funded bin Laden in the 1980s we should sit back and take whatever his organization throws at the country, or the world, today, is as flawed as arguments pre-World War Two that because Hitler was a product of the Versailles Treaty and the devastation wrought on Germany during and after World War One, Britain and France should suck up the Nazis' increasingly brazen outrages and simply hope for better times ahead.
The Germans of WWII and even Hitler become the innocent victims of the cruel and vindictive Versailles Treaty after WWI.
Germany faced strong external pressures resulting from the Versailles treaty that prohibited all development of technological weaponry.