Verbiage


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Verbiage

Business jargon added to a proposal or report to make it sound more impressive.
References in periodicals archive ?
Who speaks against special interests and who speaks to the interests of the people to have as easy access to the issues I raise as to the mass of verbiage available?
By adopting similar verbiage, the manufacturers of devices that measured, either qualitatively or quantitatively, the colors in the once humble urine test strip, elevated their product into the vaunted high-technology world associated with the most advanced non-military computer applications.
By the time you read this, she will have recognized her own political incorrectness and changed the verbiage to "person-caused disasters," or maybe "person-caused occasions of unpleasantness.
Often, poetry has been self-aggrandizing, tongue-twisting, convoluted verbiage that appealed only to a segment of literature buffs.
These include pictorial use; verbiage outlining the hazard, hazard avoidance, and consequences; and layout requirements and consistency.
The 360-degree shrink label was ideal for the verbiage needed for the drink's ingredients and benefits.
The cards use caricatures of DeGeneres as illustration, and the verbiage was developed "in close conjunction" with DeGeneres's team.
The minimalist free-verse allows ideas and recommendations to be presented in nutshell concept, without an excess of verbiage distraction from key points.
These regulations far outweighed the verbiage devoted to identifying the processional music and the uber-cute 3-year-old twins who accompanied their grandmother down the aisle.
It seems to be a maxim of human nature that people will try to "get away with something,' or, rendered in slightly more eloquent verbiage, to "capitalize on the opportunities that present themselves" In the spirit of this discussion and full disclosure, we in the insurance industry often refer to such activity as fraud.
The astute clinician will not be misled by the power and verbiage of meta-analyses and what is often erroneously called "evidence-based medicine.
Remove all the ambiguous verbiage and only four words of his statement really count: "the City gets no benefit.