Doublespeak

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Doublespeak

A political term referring to the practice of issuing contradictory statements. For example, doublespeak may involve a government publicly blaming the previous administration when things go poorly and taking credit when things go well. The term is strongly associated with government propaganda. See also: Doublethink.
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Because the coalition is in constant danger of violating the Catholic Church's prohibition on artificial birth control, staffers get around the problem with verbal gymnastics worthy of Thomist philosophers.
Dr Samuel Johnson would participate in these verbal gymnastics and on one occasion when on the receiving end of some vulgar raillery vigorously replied: "Sir, your wife, under pretence of keeping a bawdy - house, is a receiver of stolen goods".
A Unite union spokesperson said Mr Cameron's speech was "a PR exercise in verbal gymnastics due to the political pressures he is under, especially from his Liberal Democrat allies".
Most of us knew that its clauses would likely be the result of amazing feats of semantics and verbal gymnastics, while others would remain vague enough to keep all of the parties satisfied.
West was swallowed within his own extravagance, leaving a tenuous connection to hip-hop's roots of being a display of verbal gymnastics.
The verbal gymnastics some supporters have gone through to "prove" that Obama was not talking about abortion may be the kind of blather that over the years has persuaded the junior senator from Illinois he is invincible.
gt;In a nutshell: Familiar, yet with amusing verbal gymnastics.
Senators Kennedy and Feinstein and others will be conducting a hearing today filled with verbal gymnastics and word games but little scientific facts to back them up.
It was a display of verbal gymnastics that proved Brown is a better defender than Matt Elliott, Colin Hendry and Christian Dailly put together.
Which means we won't be treated to any more verbal gymnastics from any of Walford's finest screaming "Rickaaay" at the top of their cockney voices.
President Clinton, famous for his verbal gymnastics, Baroness Thatcher and Tory leader Mr William Hague all feature in the top ten of grammatically- challenged speakers.
And what of his master in the White House, George Bush, the Texas cowboy who once kept us journalists' keyboards clattering merrily away with his verbal gymnastics.