Ceres Principles

(redirected from Valdez Principles)

Ceres Principles

Ten rules guiding the investment practices of the Ceres, a nonprofit whose members include both investors and environmental organizations. The Ceres Principles require one to make investment decisions that minimize risk to the environment and promote sustainable use of natural resources. They were originally called the Valdez Principles because they were written in 1989 following the Exxon Valdez disaster.
References in periodicals archive ?
A commitment to the mission, and to responsible business practices, inspired Aveda in 1996 to become the first beauty company to adopt the CERES principles (Coalition for Environmentally Responsible Economics) - formerly know as the Valdez Principles.
Introduced in September 1989 by the Coalition for Environmentally Responsible Economies (CERES), which includes the New York City comptroller, Elizabeth Holtzman, and the California state controller, Gray Davis, as well as the Audubon Society and the Sierra Club, the Valdez Principles consist of 10 principles that a signing corporation agrees to uphold.
It is the lever behind SRI's greatest successes, such as enlisting companies to adopt the socially responsible Valdez principles or divesting much of corporate America from apartheid-era South Africa.
The CERES Principles, formerly known as the Valdez Principles, are a comprehensive 10-point guideline for corporations' environmental performance and social accountability.
The CERES Principles, formerly the Valdez Principles, comprise a comprehensive ten-point code for corporations' environmental performance and public accountability.
as independent public accountants, and defeated a proposal that the company adopt the CERES principles, formerly known as the Valdez principles.
A 10-point environmental code known as the Valdez Principles has once again captured the limelight at many of this year's annual meetings.
First put forward in September, 1989 as the Valdez Principles, the CERES Principles already have dozens of signatories, including such companies as Aveda, Ben & Jerry's, Tom's of Maine and Working Assets.
5% of Exxon shareholders support the Valdez Principles but Exxon's 1990 proxy statement included five other environmentally related shareholder proposals.
A shareholder proposal that the company become a signatory to a set of environmental standards called the Valdez Principles received less than eight percent of votes cast by stockholders.
In its proxy statement, the company said it "shares the concern of all its shareholders for the protection of the environment," but "has already adopted its own comprehensive health, environmental and safety policy which is consistent with the overall objectives of the Valdez Principles.