utility

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Utility

A power company that owns or operates facilities used for the generation, transmission, or distribution of electric energy, which is regulated at state and federal levels.

Utility

1. In economics, the level satisfaction the person derives from a good or service. Utility is inherently subjective and thus difficult to measure, but it is important in determining how much supply of a product the market can handle without diminishing demand. Historically, it has been thought that one can quantify the utility of each unit, but some economists disagree with this. See also: Austrian school, Law of Diminishing Marginal Utility.

2. A company that provides electricity, water, or gas to customers. These companies are subject to a number of regulations at the local and national levels. They borrow more than most other companies; thus, a decline in utility stocks is often seen as an indicator of a coming rise in interest rates. See also: Dow Jones Utility Average - DJUA.

utility

A business that provides an essential service, generally under government regulation. Electric companies, gas transmission firms, and local telephone companies are utilities.

utility

  1. the satisfaction or pleasure that an individual derives from the CONSUMPTION of a GOOD or SERVICE. See UTIL, CARDINAL UTILITY, ORDINAL UTILITY, MARGINAL UTILITY, TOTAL UTILITY, UTILITY FUNCTION, DIMINISHING MARGINAL UTILITY.
  2. see PUBLIC UTILITY.