Utilitarian

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Related to Utilitarians: deontologists, Kantians

Utilitarian

A person who believes moral actions must provide the greatest good to the greatest number of persons. Utilitarians emphasize the consequences of actions when evaluating their morality. For example, a utilitarian may regard a lie to a regulator as moral if it saves 2,000 jobs. Critics of utilitarianism contend that consequences are unknowable and argue that it could be used to defend atrocities. Utilitarians, on the other hand, argue that their philosophy is the best way to improve happiness in the aggregate.
References in periodicals archive ?
Diminished emotional responses, specifically, reduced empathic concern, appear to be critical in facilitating utilitarian responses to moral dilemmas of high emotional salience," the researchers concluded.
Modest successes were achieved here and there in changing the curriculum along utilitarian lines.
shall we continue to believe that utilitarian thought and labor, if only spurred more feverishly so as to produce more tonnage, will bring about the millennium it so long has promised?
In espousing the aesthetic dimension in arts education, he criticizes the utilitarian perspective as something that causes students to miss out on or not fully understand the aesthetic experience.
Utilitarians must reject this appeal, however, because it leads to lesser deterrent levels compared to those expected under a properly utilitarian system of punishment.
In light of these inferences, utilitarians must resist the appeals of proponents of limiting retributivism and insist on a more rigid utilitarian system of punishment.
These restrictions and requirements imposed significant burdens upon the utilitarians.
13) However, during World War II, when the survival of the state was at stake, the utilitarians still dominated the military decision process.
With regard to self-conscious individuals, Singer is still a utilitarian, but he is a preference utilitarian rather than a hedonistic utilitarian.
When it comes to utilitarian justifications for animal research, the probability--and Singer is correct that it is never a certainty--that various lines of research will save or significantly improve human lives must be known or estimated before anything meaningful can be said.
disability, or substance abuse--a utilitarian would also consider
retributive theory and prevention-oriented utilitarian goals.