Use Value

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Use Value

The satisfaction derived from a commodity. That is, use value is the ability of a commodity to extinguish a want. The concept dates at least to Aristotle, but is used most commonly in Marxist economics. It is analogous to utility in neoclassical economics. It differs from exchange value in that use value measures quality while exchange value measures quantity.
References in periodicals archive ?
The first is written in a dense Marxist argot that focuses on the "real subsumption" of use-value into circuits of exchange.
No matter how malevolent our art, the receiving side always seems to assign it a use-value so that rather than producing schisms in the network, what we make more often produces a method by which schisms can be closed.
Is it the title of one's works, institutional affiliations, or use-value for other rhetoricians?
The life span, or durability, of every non-perishable item is a multiplier of its use-value.
But this means that all inputs and outputs of production must be securely commodified, so that capital can achieve the indifference to use-value that is required by its single-minded focus on profit expansion.
True, there was more "stuff" available than before, and Korda persuasively argues that more of it comprised "luxury goods" (21) and that beyond simple use-value, household stuff served a "civilizing function" (19).
In analyzing toy consumption, we cannot simply disregard use-value as some suggest.
This overlaps with the process of transition from use-value to commodity production.
The study committee has compiled the results of their survey and now has six subcommittees working on data for specific issues, such as use-value assessment for farmland.
He then refers to this property of a commodity as its utility or use-value.
In further "Garlands" we are introduced to, among other things, the bizarre details of the Russian royal family's execution in 1918; some tragic residents of the Place Vendome in Paris; the burial wishes of one of the artist's parents; possible traditions underlying the Japanese wooden dolls called Kokeshi; the transsexual Ara Tripp, who scaled a Seattle electrical tower topless in the name of equal gender rights; and Humpty Dumpty's use-value in explaining the awfulness of the world to young children.
Further chapters consider the progression from use-value to sign- value, and postmodern advertising in connection to changing patterns of work and leisure, focus on enhancing consumer welfare, and spaces such as shopping malls, theme parks, and multimedia advertising as challenging modernist traditions.