Upfront Fee


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Upfront Fee

A fee paid before a good is produced or a service is performed. The upfront fee is generally a portion of the total fee that the buyer must pay. For example, one may commission an artist to paint a portrait and pay a 20% upfront fee, paying the remainder when the portrait is finished. It is also called an advance fee.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blake says there are times when an upfront fee is necessary, such as to pull your credit.
Interestingly, the median arranger upfront fee is zero for all arranger share quartiles suggesting that separate fees are paid to arrangers only in a minority of loans.
If you charge an upfront fee, you should establish a tiered progress payment policy.
But more worrying are scams offering non-existent loans in return for upfront fees - leaving those already struggling worse off.
The decrease in revenue related to an extension of the recognition period of the upfront fee and lower costs for the Phase 2b clinical trial for TRU-015 in the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis.
A spokesman said Mr Clarke's remarks were 'entirely consistent' with what Tony Blair said in December, when he told the Commons that parents would not have to pay thousands of pounds in upfront fees.
Upfront fees: The company or agent who promises to help with the loan modification charges an upfront fee before any work takes place.
Nevertheless, an untold number of companies and individuals continue to openly and flagrantly violate the rule, asking on average for an upfront fee of $2,589.
It coldcalled victims And convinced them that they could typically get compensation of PS2,000 for missold PPI for an upfront fee of PS249.
The upfront fee has always been the most challenging hurdle for new WildBlue customers, particularly in this economy," said Steve Cimmarusti of Blacksheep Satellite, a WildBlue Dealer.
They were expecting applause, but they got raspberries because almost 25 percent of Los Angeles' neighborhoods don't have any street lights at all, let alone new ones, because they can't afford the $1,600 upfront fee required from each homeowner just to install streetlights in their neighborhoods.