Unmerchantable


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Unmerchantable

Describing goods or services of such poor quality that they cannot be sold. Unmerchantable merchandise may be damaged or simply poorly made.
References in periodicals archive ?
These leading-edge technologies will enable Rentech to turn primarily unmerchantable and underutilized timber into clean, renewable jet fuel.
Biomass harvesting often refers to utilizing logging residues or otherwise unmerchantable wood for energy because it cannot be used for higher value products.
If the warranty company mess you about, go to Citizens Advice, Trading Standards or your solicitor and threaten to sue the dealer for selling a car of unmerchantable quality.
Stokes (1988) reported that "the advantages of in-woods chipping systems include the ability to recover fiber from limbs, tops, and unmerchantable wood, high productivity, and advanced site preparation.
Go back to your solicitor and ask him if you can begin legal proceedings against the garage for selling you a car of unmerchantable quality.
This may be attributed to the fact that as more defects occurred the tree was topped in the forest, or that as more defects occurred the stem was simply deemed unmerchantable.
If the warranty company muck about, go to Citizen's Advice, Trading Standards or your solicitor and threaten to sue the dealer for selling a car of unmerchantable quality.
Usually, this fire-affected material is considered unmerchantable because of concerns about wood quality, char inclusion, site damage or remote location.
However, the production differences between the two harvesting systems were due to differences in the volumes of dead and sound wood, the number of windfalls, and the number of unmerchantable trees (Favreau 1997).
6] tons) (ovendry basis) of unmerchantable material less than 10 cm (4 in.