U.S. Treasury Security

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U.S. Treasury Security

A tradable debt security owed by the United States government for a certain stated period. Each note has a stated interest rate which is paid semi-annually. Because the United States is seen as a very low-risk borrower, many investors see Treasury security interest rates (especially 10-year Treasury notes) as indicative of the wider bond market. Normally, the interest rate decreases with greater demand for the securities and rises with lower demand. For example, in December 2008, 10-year interest rates were the lowest in history due to deteriorating economic conditions and the consequent desire of investors for low-risk investments. U.S. Treasury securities are sold in auctions, usually once every few weeks. They are secured by the full faith and credit of the United States government. They should not be confused with U.S. savings bonds, which are not tradable, or indirect government obligations, which are not issued by the U.S. government itself. See also: Yield, Bond, Treasury Bond, Treasury Bill, Treasury Note.
References in periodicals archive ?
Interest rates are set by financial markets and influenced by the sale of United States Treasury securities and vice versa.
The Capital Markets Treasury Bond Index is calculated based on the total return of the United States Treasury securities with a maturity greater than one year in CPMKTB.
15(519)" (or any successor release) published by the Board of Governors of the Federal Reserve System and which establishes yields on actively traded United States treasury securities adjusted to constant maturity under the caption "Treasury Constant Maturities" or (b) if that release (or any successor release) is not published or does not contain the applicable prices on the applicable business day, the yield to maturity for the Comparable Treasury Issue for that redemption date quoted to the company by an independent investment banking firm of national standing selected by the company.
all believe that the United States Treasury Securities, purchased in a negotiated transaction from Raymond James and Associates, were excessively marked up in a practice commonly known as "yield-burning.
The aggregate amount of cash and United States treasury securities held in the trust fund as of March 31, 2007, was $58,118,729.
The 10-Year CMT is the one-week average yield on 10-year United States Treasury securities at "constant maturity" as estimated from the United States Treasury's weekly yield curve and published in the latest (June 25, 2007) Federal Reserve Statistical Release of H.
Thereafter, the interest rate will adjust on an annual basis to the sum of the weekly average yield on United States Treasury Securities adjusted to a constant maturity of one year.
The Funds will enter into long exchange-traded commodity futures positions and will also generate interest on cash and United States treasury securities held as collateral for the futures contracts they hold.
The 10-Year CMT is the one-week average yield on 10- year United States Treasury securities at "constant maturity" as estimated from the United States Treasury's weekly yield curve and published in the latest (December 26, 2006) Federal Reserve Statistical Release of H.
DBV will enter both long and short exchange traded currency futures positions, and will also generate interest on cash and United States treasury securities held as collateral for the futures contracts it holds.
The 2-Year CMT is the one week average yield on 2-year United States Treasury securities at "constant maturity" as estimated from the United States Treasury's weekly yield curve and published in the latest H.
DBC also generates interest on cash and United States treasury securities held as collateral for the futures contracts it holds.

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