U.S. Treasury Note

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U.S. Treasury Note

A debt security backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government with a maturity between one and 10 years. They may be purchased directly from the government or from a bank; they have coupon payments payable every six months. Treasury notes may be bought competitively or non-competitively. In a non-competitive transaction, one takes the interest rate he/she is given on a Treasury note. In competitive investing, one bids on a desired yield; however, this does not mean it will be accepted. Treasury notes are low-risk, low-return investments. The minimum purchase is $1,000 and the maximum is $1 million in competitive bidding, or $5 million in non-competitive. They are known informally as T notes. See also: Treasury Bill, Treasury Bond.
References in periodicals archive ?
The yield to maturity on the 6 3/4% United States Treasury Note due June 30, 1999, the Reference Security for the 12 7/8% Notes, was 4.
125% United States Treasury Note due September 30, 1999, as calculated in accordance with standard market practice, based on the bid price for such Treasury Note as of 2:00 p.
The consideration for each Note tendered pursuant to the tender offer shall be the greater of (i) 109 percent of the aggregate principal amount, or (ii) the price (calculated as more fully described in Schedule I to the Offer to Purchase for the tender offer) resulting from a yield to the first date on which Notes may be redeemed equal to the sum of (a) the yield on the 6-7/8 percent United States Treasury Note due Oct.
The aggregate consideration for each series of notes will be calculated to result in a yield to the first call date of such series of notes equal to the sum of (a) (i), for the 9 7/8% Notes, the yield on the 6 1/2% United States Treasury Note due May 31, 2002 and (ii), for the 13 1/2% Notes, the yield on the 6% United States Treasury Note due August 15, 2000, and (b) 50 basis points.
The aggregate consideration for each series of notes will be calculated to result in a yield to the first call date of such series of notes equal to the sum of (a)(i), for the 9 7/8% Notes, the yield on the 6 1/2% United States Treasury Note due May 31, 2002 and (ii), for the 13 1/2% Notes, the yield on the 6% United States Treasury Note due August 15, 2000, and (b) 50 basis points.
New York City time, on September 2, 1998 (including the consent payment of $20 per $1,000 of Notes) will be (1) the price calculated in a manner resulting in a yield to July 15, 2000 (the earliest redemption date for the Notes) equal to the sum of (x) the yield on the 5-7/8% United States Treasury Note due June 30, 2000 at 2:00 p.
The amount payable (including the consent payment) will be (1) the price calculated in a manner resulting in a yield to July 15, 2000 (the earliest redemption date for the Notes) equal to the sum of (x) the yield on the 5-7/8% United States Treasury Note due June 30, 2000 at 2:00 p.
The Purchase Price for the Notes will be calculated in a manner intended to result in a yield to May 15, 1999, the first call date for the Notes, equal to the sum of (i) the yield on the 6 3/8 percent United States Treasury Note due May 15, 1999 at 2:00 p.
Far from it: two-year United States Treasury notes with a face value of $1,000 will get you $998 in cash a" the lowest liquidity price since the Great Depression and Japan in the 1990's.
4,960,939 3,949,744 (a) Includes $500,000 received in the first quarter as the result of654 29,704,256 Total Assets 53,406,741 41,282,561 Total stockholders' equity 18,115,563 14,758,838 (b) Including United States Treasury Notes, at cost.
At March 31, 1993, the company had cash and United States Treasury Notes totaling $13,948,086 and shareholders' equity of $14,520,638.
At that dividend rate, Tyler Cabot's yield on net assets would be approximately 9-1/2 to 10 percent, which is greater than 2 percent above the current yield on 10-year United States Treasury Notes.

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