unit cost

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Unit Cost

The amount that a company spends to produce or purchase one unit of a good or service. For example, if a company buys 100 widgets for $100, the unit cost is $1.

unit cost

see AVERAGE COST.
References in periodicals archive ?
There are no alternative metal compositions that reduce the manufacturing unit cost of the penny below its face value," the U.
A sound machine design developed for continuous high performance and exceptional injection performance coupled with a high-precision controller and energy-efficient drive concept form the basis for positively influencing unit costs," explained Markus Dal Pian, Vice President Sales at Netstal.
The S&P Healthcare Claims Indices are a series of indices providing data on the cost, utilization and unit costs of healthcare services covering inpatient and outpatient services and prescription pharmaceuticals.
The vehicle cost report and its sister, the vehicle exit unit cost report, enforce a structural, performance, cost, and financial discipline that have proved to be invaluable during the reliability, availability, maintainability/rebuild to standards, and the current inspect and repair only as necessary process.
CAP7L SoCs are economical in volumes of 10K units, with a fully-amortized unit cost of US$17.
Any business needs to know two things, what their unit costs are and unit revenue and in that way they can determine unit profitability," Peri says.
If a plant spends $1 million to produce 100,000 units, it is assumed that each unit costs $10 to make.
Build a financial model to capture all of this data and calculate a true "total cost" for each service on an annual, activity or unit cost basis, whichever is most appropriate.
We were looking for a cultural fit, because if morale is high, then customer service goes up while unit costs go down.
Extraordinary improvements in business-to-business communication have held unit costs in check, in part by greatly speeding up the flow of information.
He supported his plan by multiplying all his product unit costs by the number of units estimated to be sold and reconciled the total cost of all product lines to the budgeted cost of the entire operation.
To compare, the unit costs for capacity expansion were then estimated at 63 cents/barrel for Qatar, about 39 cents for Kuwait (before Iraq's invasion), 23 cents for Iraq, 75 cents for Iran, 73 cents for Libya, $2.