Uninsured

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Uninsured

Describing any person, property, business or anything else without an insurance policy. Some uninsured persons and things may be self-insured, in cases in which insurance is a poor financial decision because the responsible party has sufficient income or wealth to pay for whatever might happen. Most of the time, however, uninsured persons and items are very risky. In some circumstances, it is illegal to be without certain kinds of insurance.
References in periodicals archive ?
Fully one-third of uninsured persons have a mental or substance use condition, and fully one-third of persons with these conditions have no health insurance.
6) It is included primarily as a control variable in the analysis, although it is possible that an uninsured person living in a zip code area with a high proportion of poor people will be more likely to learn about safety-net providers from neighbors than an uninsured person who lives in a neighborhood with relatively few poor people.
Proximity to the different types of safety net providers is also significantly related to whether an uninsured person was hospitalized.
1 percent) reported having a usual source of care and the 2003 National Health Interview Survey revealed that 80-93 percent of uninsured persons with diabetes, hypertension, or hyperlipidemia reported visiting a health professional in the prior year.
Nearly 8 in 10 of all uninsured persons who are eligible for health insurance coverage under the Medicaid Expansion effort (10.
After March 31, uninsured persons may not be able to obtain coverage on their own for the remainder of 2014 unless they experience a "qualifying event" such as marriage or the birth of a child.
Uninsured persons up to 100% of the federal poverty level (FPL) will participate in the Medicaid Expansion through the Iowa Wellness Plan.
Equally important is the projection that because of the ACA the number of uninsured persons will be reduced and therefore patients diagnosed with HIV will have better access to treatment.
But for the next age group -- those 26 to 35 years old -- the number of uninsured persons actually inched up, leading some experts to conclude the health care law must be driving the downward trend for young adults.
The list of demands is long, concerning wages, vacations, payment for extra training, overtime work but also treatment waiting lists, healthcare for uninsured persons, capital expenses of hospitals and more.
Pagan and Pauly's study notes that while uninsured persons can receive care from safety net providers in their community, the availability and quality of local health care systems often varies and may not be adequate to support the need for services.
The Congressional Budget Office estimates that the legislation will reduce the number of uninsured persons by 32 million in 2019 at a net cost of $938 billion over 10 years, while reducing the deficit by $124 billion during that period.