Uninsurable Risk

Uninsurable Risk

A risk against which one cannot purchase insurance, either because it is very likely to occur or because it would be too expensive to cover if it did. For example, a 118-year-old person may be an uninsurable risk for life insurance because the person is very likely to die before the insurer collects a sufficient amount in premiums. Likewise, one generally cannot insure against nuclear war because, even though nuclear war is unlikely, repairs and medical bills would be prohibitively expensive.
References in periodicals archive ?
This is a classic example of London Market expertise and creativity being harnessed to cover a previously uninsurable risk.
To understand this trend, as well as why flood was for a long time considered an uninsurable risk, consider the history of flood insurance in the United States.
This bespoke solution was designed to cover this traditionally uninsurable risk, which Roy Hill identified as a particular concern.
The price for not taking a highly aggressive loss-prevention approach to this largely uninsurable risk can have life-changing consequences for directors and executives, and can be costly for organizations, both financially and in the court of public opinion.
Now I have long thought that there is no such thing as an uninsurable risk and I guess this would have been true in Llandudno had the club been prepared to pay an enormous sum.
It is this hands-on approach that has caused Sitomer to be sought by developers, lending institutions, construction and design professionals and the real estate brokerage community to help design programs that address this soon-to-be uninsurable risk.
Get affordable coverage for an uninsurable risk with a dual-trigger policy.
More recently, Doherty and Schlesinger (1990) studied the effect of the presence of an uninsurable risk of the insurer's default on insurance coverage.
De Cou was informed that the building could not be insured if left unoccupied, so he had it demolished rather than remain exposed to the uninsurable risk of continued ownership.
Philippe Weil, and John Heaton and Deborah Lucas have considered the consequences of uninsurable risk for asset pricing.
Traditionally we distinguished between insurable and uninsurable risk.