Underinsured


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Underinsured

A person or company with insufficient insurance to pay for a negative event. For example, if one's health insurance has a maximum benefit of $1 million and one contracts a chronic disease whose treatment costs $2 million over several years, one may be said to be underinsured.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Florida Court of Appeal reversed the trial court because of the actions of the agent who, when asked for advice about a proposed settlement from an underinsured motorist, gave incorrect advice and failed to report the loss to the insurer.
Agreeing with Brazas's advice, and directing his remarks to underinsured matters, Nisivaco also admonished, "Don't overlook that underinsured coverage can be stacked.
Half of the underinsured and two-thirds of the uninsured went without needed care because of cost.
The number of underinsured and uninsured together represent 42 percent of U.
If patients are healthy, they may not even know they're underinsured," he added.
The court concluded that the intent behind underinsured motorist insurance required insurers to compensate their customers when injured by an underinsured co-worker.
A new report commissioned by the Catholic Health Association on the health care safety net challenges Congress to do a better job in helping Catholic and other nonprofit hospitals provide care for the uninsured and the underinsured, a congressman said at a Capitol Hill news conference Nov.
This year, 13 state AIDS Drug Assistance Programs (ADAPs) have been forced to take steps to limit access to life-saving HIV medications for uninsured and underinsured Americans due to inadequate funding.
Sound risk management and insurance choices are a good start to ensuring that your employees and their families are protected in the event of an automobile accident with an uninsured or underinsured motorist.
That, coupled with low pay and underinsured conditions, creates a situation whereby dancers may be more apt to ignore health problems.
Tomasky recounts the tragic dissipation of this majority in the face of Harry-and-Louise ads and a pusillanimous White House, but then whips around and blames the left again--for putting "too much emphasis on the uninsured" rather than emphasizing "uninsured and underinsured alike" (the latter group, of course, containing the great white middle class).