Underemployment


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Related to Underemployment: Disguised unemployment

Underemployment

A term used to describe persons who are working part time but would like to work full time, or persons whose skills exceed those needed for the job they are performing. For example, an economist working as a retail clerk may be described as underemployed. Underemployment increases during recessions and periods of slow economic growth.
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Figure 2 plots the seasonally adjusted underemployment rate and the unemployment rate.
Underemployment decreases as income increases as shown by the blue arrow that points downward from 35% to 10% of the labor force.
In addition to measuring the seriousness, likelihood and potential impact of these 31 global risks, Global Risks 2014 includes special investigations into three specific cases: the increasing risk of "cybergeddon" in the online world; the increasing complexity of geopolitical risk as the world moves to a multi-polar distribution of power and influence; and youth unemployment and underemployment.
College graduates in general have fared better than those without a college degree in the conventional measures of underemployment.
According to the report, "Underemployment in Urban and Rural America, 2005-2012," the rate of underemployment (or involuntary part-time work) doubled during the second year of the recession, reaching roughly 6.
Keywords: labor underutilization, underemployment, economic development
THIS COLLECTION is a sequel to The Education-Jobs Gap: Underemployment or Economic Democracy (1999) by D.
The IRS also has developed a draft model affidavit, Form W-11, for employees to certify their un- or underemployment status.
6% in the 1st, the HCP said, adding that the rate of underemployment rose from 9.
TheAaAa underemployment rate in the country-which counts part-time employees searching for full-time jobs and people who want work but have given up their job hunt-also reduced from 17.
The figures becomes gloomier if we look at the broader measure of underemployment.
Underemployment is a more comprehensive measure of labor market slack than headline-grabbing unemployment rates because it also includes part-time workers who want full-time jobs--involuntarily part-time workers--and jobless workers who want a job but are not actively seeking employment--marginally-attached workers.