U.S. Information Agency

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U.S. Information Agency

A former organization of the U.S. State Department that distributed information to foreign countries. It advocated American policy abroad. During the Cold War, its content was largely pro-American propaganda. It existed from 1953 to 1999.
References in periodicals archive ?
The Voice of America, created in 1942 to counter adverse foreign propaganda, was incorporated into the USIA in 1953.
26) Charles Harner, PAO USIS-Caracas, to USIA Washington, 13 July 1961; Latin America; FSD 1954-1965; Records of the USIA, RG 306; NARA.
Western research has shown that 90-100 million listeners tune in the Voice of America (VOA), the radio-broadcasting arm of USIA, each week.
Most overseas USIA employees are Foreign Service officers hired through the Foreign Service examination.
On a number of occasions, the endowment has taken advantage of its alleged private status to influence foreign elections, an activity that is beyond the scope of AID or USIA and otherwise would be possible only through a CIA covert operation.
When a new director for the USIA was confirmed by the Senate, Connie Coutellier and I requested a joint meeting with him to share the concerns of the camp using this program.
The reason that someone proposed to put it under the USIA is that BIB is a federal, independent agency.
Currently there is a five-year ban on the importation of Coroma textiles, which have been recognized as being owned communally by the Indians and of "important historic, religious, and social significance in their daily lives," according to the USIA.
The United States Information Agency (USIA) has been active in sponsoring USIA Academic Specialist grants to individuals as well as USIA institutional grants.
This group raises $2 million annually through programs like the USIA Gold Pass and about a dozen ski balls across the country.
He wisely notes that these programs, run by agencies ranging from the CIA to USIA (United States Information Agency, 1953-1999), were
Beginning with the development of information and cultural programs during World War II, Cull's narrative, organized in chapters on presidential administrations and USIA directors, deals principally with the decades between USIA's creation in 1953 and the end of the Cold War in 1989.