U.S. Direct Investment Abroad

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U.S. Direct Investment Abroad

A major investment by an American corporation outside the United States. For example, an American company may buy a factory in Indonesia because labor costs are lower. Many economists believe that U.S. direct investment abroad is good for an economy, as it provides jobs and increases domestic capital. Critics point out that profits usually leave the invested country and go to the American company. U.S. direct investment abroad is a type of foreign direct investment.
References in periodicals archive ?
The revised estimates of the USDIA position for 2003-2004 and of the FDIUS position for 2002-2004 incorporate new information from BEA's quarterly, annual, and benchmark surveys.
The historical-cost USDIA position for 2003 was revised down $22.
parent companies and their foreign affiliates give an indication of the degree to which indirect ownership affects the country and industry distribution of the USDIA position data.
4) For example, in a comparison of the estimates of the USDIA position with the closely related estimates of the net property, plant, and equipment (PP&E) of foreign affiliates, the 22-percent share of the position accounted for by manufacturing (in 2005) differs sharply from the 41-percent share of PP&E accounted for by manufacturing (in 2003, the latest year for which operations data are available).
For further discussion of the effect of holding companies on the estimates of USDIA series, see the "Technical Note" in Maria Borga and Raymond J.
Estimates of the USDIA position and related flows are allocated to the industries and countries of the affiliates with which the U.
With the 2004 USDIA position data, the disparities were higher still; the share of the position accounted for by manufacturing was 20 percent, and the share accounted for by the Netherlands was 10 percent.
For USDIA, capital flows without current-cost adjustment include the funds that U.
BEA prepares estimates of the positions for USDIA and for FDIUS that are valued on three bases--historical cost, current cost, and market value.
A summary of the revised estimates of the USDIA position for 2003 and 2004 and revised estimates of the FDIUS position for 2002-2004 are also presented.
Detailed estimates of the USDIA position and related capital flows, income, and services transactions for 1982-2005 and detailed estimates of the FDIUS position and related capital flows, income, and services transactions for 1980-2005 are available on BEA's Web site.
The USDIA position declined in 1982, but the decline was the result of special factors.