Secretary of the Treasury

(redirected from US Secretary of the Treasury)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.
Related to US Secretary of the Treasury: Secretary of State, Secretary of Defense

Secretary of the Treasury

In the United States, the head of the Department of the Treasury, which is responsible for the printing of money, the collection of taxes, the regulation of banks and the management of public debt. He/she is appointed by the president with the consent of the Senate.
References in periodicals archive ?
It includes introductory remarks by former US Secretary of the Treasury Michael Blumenthal, who was among these 20,000 refugees, a glossary, map, and photos.
request, the US Secretary of the Treasury exercises his or her
After a phone call with US Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew on Friday, Prime Minister Hazem El-Beblawi announced that the US will help the economy "by collaborating with international institutions led by the IMF and by abiding by the desires and requests of the Egyptian government.
former US Secretary of the Treasury, and Lawrence Kudlow, host of "The Kudlow Report" broadcast on CNBC will interview Mr.
Fannie Mae's core capital is below 125 percent of its critical capital requirement; or Fannie Mae's core capital is below its minimum capital requirement and, pursuant to the company's request, the US Secretary of the Treasury exercises his or her discretionary authority under Section 304(c) of the Company's Charter Act to purchase the company's debt obligations.
Prime Minister Hazem El-Beblawi stated that the US government showed willingness to support the Egyptian economy after his call with US Secretary of the Treasury Jack Lew on Thursday.
Indeed US Secretary of the Treasury, John Snow, recently praised Lloyd's in how it "stepped up to the plate" and honoured its obligations following September 11th.
This would almost be equivalent to the scandal involving AIG when the bailed out insurance company controversially paid major international banks (including ABN AMRO USA on 23 September 2008) 100 cents on the dollar on their complex derivative deals - with the approval of Timothy Geithner, then US Secretary of the Treasury - at the expense of American taxpayers.

Full browser ?