U.S. Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933

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U.S. Agricultural Adjustment Act of 1933

Legislation in the United States intended to provide relief for farmers and other agricultural workers during the Great Depression. Because of high production in the years leading up to the passage of the Act, prices for agricultural commodities were extremely low. The Act paid farmers not to grow more than a certain amount of crops in order to raise prices. It also paid them to reduce populations of pigs and cows for the same reason. The pork and beef resulting from the slaughter of excess animals were distributed through the Federal Emergency Relief Administration. The Act was part of the New Deal.