Operation Iraqi Freedom

(redirected from U.S.-Iraq War)

Operation Iraqi Freedom

The official United States military name for the war between the U.S. and its allies and Saddam Hussein's Iraq and later various insurgent groups. Operation Iraqi Freedom removed Saddam Hussein, Iraq's dictator, from power. However, it created a significant power vacuum, which led to high levels of violence. Economically, it disrupted Iraq's oil production during a period of time in which oil prices quadrupled. Operation Iraqi Freedom lasted from 2003 to 2011; it was controversial both in the United States and abroad.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to Raed Jarrarr, an Iraqi-American political analyst, "The U.
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