U.S. Treasury Bond

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U.S. Treasury Bond

A debt security backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government with a maturity of more than 10 years. They may be purchased directly from the government or from a bank; they have coupon payments payable every six months. Treasury bonds may be bought competitively or non-competitively. In a non-competitive transaction, one takes the interest rate he/she is given on a T-bond. In competitive investing, one bids on a desired yield, but this does not mean it will be accepted. Treasury bonds are low-risk, low-return investments. The minimum purchase is $1,000 and the maximum is $5 million in non-competitive bidding or 35% of the offering in competitive. They are known informally as T-bonds. See also: Treasury bill, Treasury note.
References in periodicals archive ?
18 billion, mainly due to a fall in the value of its holdings of U.
5 percent of GDP, and the budget deficit is also out of control, but the only reason these twin deficits have not yet produced problems such as a dollar crisis and dramatic, abrupt rate hikes from the Fed is that the Chinese and the Japanese have been heavily buying U.
Foreign central banks, led by China and Japan, now hold roughly $1 trillion in U.
The rest of the cash infusion would be kept, as Social Security's reserves have been in the past, in safer, but historically lower-yielding, U.
Zeros are sold through brokers (typically for about a 1% commission charge) and represent ownership of future interest or principal payments, normally on U.
5% of outstanding school debt issued prior to July 2003 and 1% of outstanding school debt issued after July, 2003, is currently invested in U.
In addition to taking the charge, BankAmerica said it would reduce its risk from the fund by purchasing Shaw's entire fixed-income portfolio, which contains about $20 billion of securities - primarily U.
The increasing number of financial institutions, many chasing the same deals, have led lenders to seek new lending opportunities and to reduce the margin, or spread, which is added to the yield on U.
That was largely because an increasingly strong dollar pushed U.

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