U.S. Treasury Bond

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U.S. Treasury Bond

A debt security backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government with a maturity of more than 10 years. They may be purchased directly from the government or from a bank; they have coupon payments payable every six months. Treasury bonds may be bought competitively or non-competitively. In a non-competitive transaction, one takes the interest rate he/she is given on a T-bond. In competitive investing, one bids on a desired yield, but this does not mean it will be accepted. Treasury bonds are low-risk, low-return investments. The minimum purchase is $1,000 and the maximum is $5 million in non-competitive bidding or 35% of the offering in competitive. They are known informally as T-bonds. See also: Treasury bill, Treasury note.
References in periodicals archive ?
According to research from the University of California-Davis, premium rates are actually tied to the rise and fall of the Dow Jones Industrial Average and interest rates on U.
The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government bond fell Thursday morning as investors bought the safe-haven bonds spurred by the overnight trend of buying U.
said, "Commercial Defeasances' ability to think beyond the ordinary, specifically to find higher yielding securities than run-of-the-mill U.
85 percent) between these ten-year ROK bonds and U.
Foreign central banks, which hold more than half the outstanding stock of U.
Foreign central banks, led by China and Japan, now hold roughly $1 trillion in U.
The rest of the cash infusion would be kept, as Social Security's reserves have been in the past, in safer, but historically lower-yielding, U.
A recently as 10 years ago, it was illegal for most Japanese investors to own U.
The yield on the benchmark 10-year Japanese government bond remained unchanged Thursday from the previous trading day as buying spurred by the overnight trend of purchasing U.
5 percent of GDP, and the budget deficit is also out of control, but the only reason these twin deficits have not yet produced problems such as a dollar crisis and dramatic, abrupt rate hikes from the Fed is that the Chinese and the Japanese have been heavily buying U.

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