two-way market

(redirected from Two sided markets)

Two-Way Market

A market for a security where both an open bid and an open ask are quoted. This indicates that there are both willing buyers and sellers for the security, though their prices may not be the same. While a two-way market is not necessarily liquid, it is by definition more liquid than a one-way market, where there is either no willing buyer or no willing seller currently available. It is also called a two-sided market.

two-way market

References in periodicals archive ?
This limitation to market definition in high-tech cases involving two sided markets is just part of what is increasingly a convergence across the Atlantic of the limits of the use of market definition, particularly in merger analysis.
54) And an increasing number of papers have sought to propose stepwise methods for the identification of two sided markets.
At some junctures of the judgment, however, the two sided markets theory is given some currency.
Also real estate agents are studied by many searches as the example of two sided markets (Rochet and Tirole, 2003, pp.
In this case, pricing has all the standard issues associated with two sided markets (ARMSTRONG, 2006; ROCHET & TIROLE, 2006).
7) See ARMSTRONG (2006), ROCHET & TIROLE (2006) for an introduction to two sided markets.
2012): "Investment in Two Sided Markets and the Net Neutrality Debate", SSRN Scholarly Paper ID 1641359.
The free content market (or market segment (6)) is a two sided market with Internet sites (platforms) connecting advertisers, one side of the market, to consumers, the other side of the market.
Two sided markets applied to telecoms would mean that, downstream, there is a relationship between ISPs and consumers, and, upstream, possibly but optionally, contractual relations between ISPs and content or online service providers to offer enhanced managed services.
In two sided markets with networks effects, users on one side care not only about the number of users on the other side, but also on their quality (FILISTRUCCHI & KLEIN, 2015).
They argue that, from a theoretical point of view, it is impossible to apply Coase's theorem (1960) to two sided markets, since the transaction between sellers and buyers takes place only if there is a platform.
Pricing strategies are also important since two sided markets work because the catalyst often subsidizes one customer group in order to attract the other.