alley

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alley

A path between buildings or behind buildings, usually with walls on both sides.

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Twichell summarized PRA's contribution: "Of the 1,420 miles [2,280 kilometers] of highway across Canada to Alaska that were opened to the public after World War II, about two-thirds (970 miles [1,560 kilometers]) consisted of the original Army pioneer road, all of which had been substantially improved and upgraded by the PRA.
The Reverend Twichell was Twain's companion that night at Delmonico's, as he had been fourteen years earlier, when Twain's silk umbrella went missing during the 1875 game.
Twichell is of a generation that is post Beat and post Confessional.
The fact that Twain was travelling with his family--though this information is generally elided in the book--and, briefly but crucially, with friend and minister, Joe Twichell (the 'Harris' who never really comes fully to life there) may also help to explain such a difference.
1-2, Twichell Auditorium, Converse College, 580 E Main St, 864/596-9725 TENNESSEE Nashville The Radio City Christmas Spectacular, through Dec.
William Turner Lindsey Tweed and Claudia King Sophia and Jonathan Twichell Mr.
The judges were Charles Wright, Chase Twichell and Charles Simic.
John, Witham Logan, Brenda Hillman, James Galvin, Mark Jarman, Chase Twichell, with Jorie Graham bringing up the rear--was there something in the awful Iowa City water?
Toward this goal, the author and Dave Twichell (US Geological Survey) led an Office of Naval Research-sponsored expedition to survey portions of Block Island Sound before and after large storms.
Among those first mentioned in the letters of this period are Elisha Bliss, the publisher who helped Twain make an early fortune in the subscription book trade; Joseph Twichell, the Hartford minister who would remain one of Twain's closest friends throughout the remainder of their lives; and most conspicuously, Olivia Langdon, who inspired Twain, at least in his letters, to almost unbelievable displays of boyish gush and spiritual anguish.
In reading new books by Jorie Graham and Chase Twichell, it becomes clear to me that the dynamics between poetry and personality have changed somewhat.
Joseph Hopkins Twichell, Frederick Beecher Perkins, Charles Dudley Warner, and others.