Tulip Mania

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Tulip Mania

History's first major asset bubble. Tulips were introduced to Europe from the Ottoman Empire in the mid-1500s and became very popular in the Netherlands. As they grew in popularity, prices for tulips rose steadily, then unsustainably, in the 1630s. Prices suddenly collapsed in February 1637. Interestingly, tulip mania resulted in the creation of a formal futures market and marked one of the first times when contracts were traded without exchanging the underlying asset.
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From Tulipmania in Rembrandt's Amsterdam to subprime lunacy in Bernanke's New York, the lessons of markets are always learnt the hard way.
The Tulipmania in Ottawa is celebrated with 10,000 tulip bulbs that were gifted by Holland for saving the Dutch royal family about half a century ago.
The term tulipmania is now used to refer to any large economic bubble.
Aquaphobia, tulipmania, biophilia: a moral geography of the Dutch landscape.
The exhibition Tulipmania displayed the new works of artist Ali Bilgrami who combined contemporary miniature painting, drawing and liquid light prints.
Booms and busts; an encyclopedia of economic history from tulipmania of the 1630s to the global financial crisis of the 21st century; 3v.
TULIPMANIA is rife in gardening circles and it's easy to see why as they fill the garden with colour and shape in late spring.
To take it from a game perspective, someone who likes Tulipmania 1637 (49) which has the players taking the roles of investors in a volatile tulip market and has the appeal characteristics of character, both from the other player and from roleplaying, and story as you participate in telling it.
When Tulipmania was at its height - back in 17th century Amsterdam - people were so taken by the flowers something close to house prices were said to be paid for the prized bulbs.
Such a prudent outlook would have prevented such bubbles as the Tulipmania in Holland in the seventeenth century, and it could have avoided the similar financial exuberance demonstrated in the U.
OK, I wasn't around during Tulipmania (1640) and The South Sea Bubble (1770s); and despite appearances I wasn't there at the time of the 1929 stock crash.
Anne Goldgar's article recasts virtually all of Montias's research tools--markets, social networks, and archives--in the study of Holland's Tulipmania and, with the help of the Montias Database, shows the overlap between flower speculators and art collectors.