Tuition


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical, Legal, Encyclopedia, Wikipedia.

Tuition

The money one must pay for an educational program. While the word may apply to any program, it is especially used in reference to private primary and secondary schools and post-secondary education. For example, a university may charge a student $30,000 to attend for a year. Various scholarships, grants, loans and other forms of financial aid exist to reduce the burden of tuition.
References in periodicals archive ?
To allow the board to adopt the tuition increase by March, administrators had to rush through the usual tuition-setting procedures, she said.
Multiple lawmakers - Democrats and Republicans - filed bills this year seeking to slow or block tuition growth, noting that the statewide average for tuition has more than doubled since the Legislature stopped regulating it in 2003.
For the Queens, Manhattan, Oakdale, and International Locations: The tuition freeze will enable current full-time undergraduate students to save the planned three percent tuition increase for the 2015-16 academic year, with a total savings of approximately $14 million for the whole student body.
Parents would then prefer to send their children to tuition classes just to keep them from getting involved in undesirable activities or just to prevent them from idling their time away.
The tuition freeze is part of ADU's strategy of establishing a state of equilibrium between highly competitive academic standards and value for money.
That would result in us purchasing future tuition and fees at the same cost we would pay in the future or, worse, at a higher cost--if college education costs fall instead of grow," says Anjuan.
Full-time resident students now pay $1,632 tuition a year.
The tuition centers can be found in every nook and corner of the twin cities claiming 'money back guarantee'.
Beall's measure would guarantee students a financial benefit equivalent to the amount of tuition purchased.
Colleges that pursue strategies for tuition increases, discount rates, financial aid budgets, academic quality, diversity, and size separately often embark on journeys that may work in the short run but have serious long-term consequences for their financial and institutional health--and their academic reputation.
This issue is common in the case of tuition and fees for special schools.