Tuath

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Tuath

An obsolete Irish unit of area equivalent to 4,320 acres.
References in periodicals archive ?
She added: "I had a huge interest in Irish mythology and the Tuatha de Danann and I loved listening to Horslips albums about ancient heroes and the Morrigan.
Some believed leprechauns were descendents of the Goddess Danu and the Tuatha De Danaan.
The name Nodens/Nudens appears to be cognate with the Old Irish Nuada, who in the 'Irish Mythological Cycle' was the first king of the Tuatha De Danaan.
A close runner-up is a 34 819-letter specimen in Gods and Fighting Men: The Story of the Tuatha de Danaan and of the Fianna of Ireland, arranged and translated by I.
The main focus will be set on the grianan of aileach fort and the mythical tuatha de danann folklore accompanying it.
According to legend, Nuada was the first king of the Tuatha De Danann, who lost his hand (or his arm, depending) in single combat, and had to relinquish his leadership.
It suggests that in a land in which every tuatha had its monastery, and before the invention of printing, Ireland was, in Liam Miller's words, "the greatest producer of books in the world.
Irish king Nuadha, ruler of the Tuatha De Danann, your people, for whom
The first mention of the law appears to be when the Fir Bolg and Tuatha De Dannan negotiated "under the laws of battle" before the Battle of Moytura in 3303 BC.
The Mythological Cycle contains stories about the Tuatha De Danann, a magical, mythological race.
Irish children are fascinated by the Welsh stories I share with them, especially those with Irish aspects like Melangell and Branwen - and they tell me stories from their own culture of Cuchulainn, Finn, the Tuatha De Danaan - in return.
Pre-Norman (pre-'English') invaders included Cessair, Partholon, Nemed, the Fir Bolgs, the Tuatha De Danann, the Milesians, and the Danes, and this narrative was deeply embedded in Irish historiography, from as early as the time of the writing of the Lebor Gabdla Erenn [Book of Invasions of Ireland] in the eleventh century.