trustor

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Trustor

One who gives money and/or other assets to a trust. A trustor usually sets up a trust in order to provide for the financial future of a minor child or mentally incompetent person. A trustor may also set up a trust to benefit a charitable organization. It is important to note that the trustor does not hold or invest the assets once they are given to the trust, as that is the duty of the trustee. See also: Escrow, Charitable trust.

trustor

The person or organization that creates a trust.
References in periodicals archive ?
Several experimental studies of one-shot two-player trust games show that communication increases cooperation between trustor and trustee (Ben-Ner and Putterman 2009; BenNer, Putterman, and Ren 2011; Buchan, Croson, and Johnson 2006; Charness and Dufwenberg 2006; Glaeser et al.
In this game, player 1 acts as a trustor, player 2 embodies both the trustor's and trustee's characteristics, and player 3 always acts as a trustee.
When millions of soldiers and their families accepted their duty to fight in the global war against fascism, they were, in essence, accepting their respective government's promises about the ultimate purposes of the war, thus giving their express or tacit consent (depending on the sui generis circumstances), a key factor for Locke in the formation of a binding political obligations; this includes the creation of a trust in which the people, in Locke's scenario, who are both the trustors and the beneficiaries.
The scope of this study is limited primarily to the psychological processes of the trustor (see Wekselberg, 1996).
define dyadic or interpersonal trust as "The willingness of a party to be vulnerable to the actions of another party based on the expectation that the other will perform a particular action important to the trustor, irrespective of the ability to monitor or control that other party" (1995: 712).
The ideas of John Locke as developed in his Second Treatise help to define and describe the fiduciary nature of these wartime declarations and promises; specifically, Locke describes governments as simply trustees who must preserve the rights of the people who are both the trustors and beneficiaries of this fiduciary arrangement.
The Schedule 13D further states that (i) the trustors and the trustee are dissatisfied with the present management of Alco and intend, in the longer term, to change the composition of the board of directors and the management of Alco, but have no present, specific plan for such changes and do not contemplate the changing any of Alco's directors or management at this time; (ii) it is the intent of the trustors and the trustee that the trust should acquire a controlling interest in Alco's stock through deposits of additional stock in the voting trust; and (iii) it is likely that some trustors or other persons will acquire stock in the public market for deposit in the trust.
In the organizational literature, one of the most frequently mentioned definitions was coined by Mayer, Davis and Schoorman (1995), according to whom "trust is the willingness of one party to be vulnerable to the actions of another party based on the expectation that the other will perform a particular action important to the trustor, irrespective of the ability to monitor or control that other party" (p.