trigger point

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Trigger Point

An event that causes another event. For example, an exchange may stop trade on a stock if its price drops by 10% in a single trading session. In that case, the trigger point is the 10% drop.

trigger point

The event or condition that initiates a predetermined action. For example, the New York Stock Exchange halts trading in stocks when the Dow Jones Industrial Average declines by a specified number of points (the trigger point) in a trading session.
References in periodicals archive ?
If patients have trigger points, send them to a registered massage therapist that specializes in neuromuscular therapy.
Trigger points are physiological contractures characterised by local ischemia, hypoxia, significantly lower pH, altered chemical milieu, local and referred pain and altered muscle activation pattern.
Physical therapists have been treating trigger points and myofascial restrictions with their hands for decades, and the filiform needle is simply an extension of this," argues dance medicine specialist Erika Johnson.
SMR first became popular with world class athletes who used SMR to aid in their athletic performances through increased range of motion, increased flexibility, and quicker recovery (Okamoto, Masuhara, & Ikuta, 2014; Trigger Point Performance, 2015).
Attenuated skin blood flow response to nociceptive stimulation of latent myofascial trigger points.
A 2011 double-blind RCT randomized 68 female patients with both fibromyalgia and myofascial trigger points to either active trigger point injections with 1 mL 0.
Trigger points can be anything that makes you eat without actually being hungry or that puts you off exercise - and naturally Christmas is packed with them
Myofascial trigger points are defined as hyperirritable points located in taut bands of skeletal muscle or fascia which when compressed cause local tenderness and/or referred pain (Simons 2002, Tough et al 2009, Yap 2007).
Moody's based its rating assessment on the higher of the two separate trigger points, namely the 7% CET 1 trigger point at the level of GCA (and not the 5.
The concept of trigger points was taken a step further by Headley who, in treating myofascial pain, identified strings of related trigger points which form myofascial chains.
Low jitter and 3-ns rise and fall times allow users to set trigger points more accurately.