Treasury

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Treasury

US Department of the Treasury, which issues all Treasury bonds, notes, and bills as well as overseeing agencies. Also, the department within a corporation that oversees its financial operations including the issuance of new shares.

Treasury

1. The department of the federal government responsible for the printing of money, the collection of taxes, the regulation of banks, and the management of public debt. Created in 1789, the Treasury issues Treasury securities, which is debt that the American government uses to pay for some of its functions. It also administers the Internal Revenue Service, which collects taxes and decides how tax laws and regulations are enforced, and the U.S. Mint, which prints and disburses currency. The Treasury Department is responsible for investigating and prosecuting certain financial crimes, such as tax evasion and counterfeiting. It is headed by the Secretary of the Treasury, who is appointed by the President with the consent of the Senate.

2. See: U.S. Treasury Security.

treasury

  1. the department within a firm which is responsible for managing the firm's finances, making arrangements to collect cash speedily from debtors; profitably invest any short-term cash surpluses; and arrange with lenders to cover any short-term cash shortages. In large multidivisional companies the treasury department may also arrange to transfer cash from company divisions earning surpluses to divisions experiencing liquidity problems so as to minimize external borrowings. In MULTINATIONAL ENTERPRISES the treasury department may also transfer funds between countries and convert currencies in order either to minimize the risk of losses or to take advantage of possible windfall gains from EXCHANGE RATE changes.
  2. the Treasury, the UK government department responsible for managing the government's finances, authorizing the expenditure plans of government DEPARTMENTS, and overseeing the tax-gathering work of the INLAND REVENUE and CUSTOMS AND EXCISE. In addition the Treasury advises the Chancellor of the Exchequer on the government's annual Budget. See BUDGET (GOVERNMENT).

Treasury

the UK government department responsible for managing the government's finances, authorizing expenditure plans for various government departments such as Health, Education and Defence, and overseeing the tax-gathering work of the INLAND REVENUE and CUSTOMS AND EXCISE. In addition, the Treasury prepares forecasts of future economic activity levels and advises the CHANCELLOR OF THE EXCHEQUER on the government's annual budget.
References in classic literature ?
No, no,' said Treasury, 'that is not the light in which one so distinguished for practical knowledge and great foresight, can be expected to regard it.
From this great treasury of waters issue forth limpid streams, which, augmenting as they descend, become main tributaries of the Missouri on the one side, and the Columbia on the other; and give rise to the Seeds-ke-dee Agie, or Green River, the great Colorado of the West, that empties its current into the Gulf of California.
Item, that the contents of the Treasury be preserved intact.
The August 4th Wall Street Journal reported: "At the end of May, Japan was the largest foreign owner of Treasurys with a holding of $429 billion.
government debt and the trade deficit continue to mount, and Asian investors become less interested in buyiug Treasurys, the stage is being set for a "truly massive devaluation of the dollar.
Treasury yields rose sharply and the overall market suffered losses as spreads (the difference in yield or income that securities must pay to compensate for the additional risk) over Treasurys widened.
In a reversal of the post-crisis trend, spreads widened across most non-Treasury sectors; that is, yields on non-Treasury securities rose faster than on similar-duration Treasurys.
This, however, is a much more complicated task and requires a great deal more business skill than the risk management that naturally falls within the treasury group's organizational purview.
The experience of the past several years can, in our view, be read as ratifying the importance and usefulness of the Government Securities Act and of the rules that the Treasury has promulgated under the authority that the act granted it.