transition economy

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transition economy

a term used to describe a country the economic system of which is moving away from a CENTRALLY PLANNED ECONOMY based upon a centralized national plan to a decentralized PRIVATE-ENTERPRISE ECONOMY based upon the PRICE SYSTEM.
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Stronger regional integration can help raise exports as a share of GDP, which would have to double in order to match those of other small transition economies that are now in the EU, while private investment in countries where the public sector is still the main driver of the economy will also need to increase.
Keywords Institutional pressures * Institutional freedom * Foreign direct investment * Outward international joint ventures * Transition economies * China
It outlines measurement methods used to evaluate the extent and nature of the shadow economy and shadow labor force, both indirect methods and direct survey methods; the findings of the MIMIC (model approach and multiple causes and multiple indicators) indirect measurement method in terms of the shadow economy of 162 developing and transition economies from 1999 to 2007 and across OECD (Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development) countries; the results of direct survey methods using International Labour Organization data and the 2007 Eurobarometer survey across 27 European countries; and policy approaches to the shadow economy.
As a reference book with a broad coverage of topics and of the literature on transition economies and transitions economics, this new Palgrave MacMillan dictionary reaches its objectives and will prove its usefulness.
Amid lower commodity prices, large capital outflows and increased financial market volatility, growth in developing and transition economies has slowed to its weakest pace since the global financial crisis of 2008-2009, it noted.
This paper presents the results of an analysis of 28 transition economies during the Global Financial Crisis of 2007-2009.
However, with the exception of Kazakhstan, growth in merchandise exports from the Central Asian countries during the past decade has generally been below the rates reported by comparable developing and transition economies.
From 2000 to 2008, the transition economies experienced something of a boom, fueled in part by the global bubble economy that increased inflows of FDI, thereby increasing both the rate of capital formation and the growth of TFP through technology spillovers (Brada and Slaveski, 2012).
This paper is concerned with the question of whether the same set of criteria should be applied when assessing the entry of both mature and transition economies into the euro-zone - and why or why not.
The UN Conference on Trade and Development (UNCTAD) on Thursday reported that foreign investment in developing and transition economies rose to US$745 billion in the first half of 2013, up some 4 per cent over the same period last year.
Developing and transition economies are likely to grow by almost five per cent and three per cent, respectively.
While developing and transition economies are likely to grow by almost five percent and three percent respectively.
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