Transaction Cost

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Transaction Cost

The total cost of a security transaction after commissions, taxes, and other expenses. For example, a security has a price, but transaction costs include the fee one must pay the broker, capital gains taxes, among other things.
References in periodicals archive ?
On the other hand, the actions by governments that promote the RCA can be explained by transaction cost economics (TCE) (Coase 1988).
Amongst the prominent theories are transaction cost economics theory, theory of core competencies, knowledge based-view theory, resource based-view theory and etc.
At its very root, the market transactions of transaction cost economics focus on individual transactions along with the human actors who are integral participants in the exchange (Williamson, 2008).
The application of transaction cost economics to the innovation process turns on an assessment of the relative strengths of these networks.
One of the weaknesses of transaction cost economics is that it overemphasizes cost minimization and neglects the value created by a transaction as well as the influence of social structure on economic life (Uzzi, 1997).
Transaction cost economics (North, 1990; Williamson, 1975) holds that managers choose the least costly method of organizing.
Transaction cost economics (TCE) has developed over the years to be an informative theory in management research.
Section 2 provides a brief overview of the different approaches to empirical research in transaction cost economics.
Critics of transaction cost economics (TCE) argue that TCE is not able to explain variations in governance arrangements between the extremes of market and hierarchy.
Clearly, the transaction cost economics for most small and medium business enterprises dictate the necessity to move goods and services to a Web commerce platform and essentially lower the operational burden associated with selling to customers," said Frank J.
Editorial will focus on the agricultural and food industry worldwide and covers advances in game theory, economics of information, transaction cost economics, and bargaining theory in the analysis of agricultural and food industrial organization and policy issues.
The paper also interprets the changes with two perspectives: transaction cost economics and a power and control theory.

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