Proprietary Information

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Proprietary Information

The information, concepts, designs or anything else that sets a business apart from its competitors and that is therefore kept secret. Other examples of proprietary information may include a company's computer systems, employee salaries, and so forth. Proprietary information may always be kept secret and is never subject to public disclosure. For instance, a fried chicken restaurant is never required to reveal the spices used in its recipe. Proprietary information is also called a trade secret.
References in periodicals archive ?
The written request must also include "a description of procedures to be used to maintain the confidentiality of the disclosed information" and "agree in a written confidentiality agreement that the health professional, employee, or designated representative, will not use the trade secret information for any purpose other than the health need(s) asserted and agree not to release the information under any circumstance other to" OSHA.
You do have some room to argue about how and if the trade secret is disclosed based on these standards of a non-crisis situation.
The company's NYC private investigator team specializes in corporate consulting, asset recovery, employment screening and trade secret protection.
Sometimes, though, employees may slip up and reveal a trade secret.
The Knowledge Group is producing a live, two hour webcast entitled Trade Secret Mediations in 2015: What You Need to Know in 2015 to help companies and their counsel better understand, manage, and resolve trade secret theft cases.
First, while only some MNCs have commercially valuable trademarks, patents, and copyrights in China, the majority of MNCs doing business in China either have commercially valuable trade secrets when they enter the Chinese market or develop them in quick order.
In order to promote fair competitiveness and an innovative business environment, restrictions to the use of trade secrets are justified in cases where the relevant know-how of information has been obtained from the trade secret holder against its will through dishonest means.
Conversely, a trade secret need not be patentable to be protectable and have value.
On December 28, 2012, President Obama signed the "Theft of Trade Secrets Clarification Act of 2012," which clarifies and expands the scope of the Economic Espionage Act of 1996 to protect services (not just products) "used in or intended for use in" interstate or foreign commerce.
3) FUTSA requires courts to protect the secrecy of trade secrets during litigation through the use of protective orders and other measures.
18) The inclusion of trade secrets as an exemption was interesting because FOIA does not provide a definition of the term "trade secrets.
make it inevitable that he will use or disclose those trade secrets in