Trademark

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Trademark

A distinctive name or symbol used to identify a product or company and build recognition. Trademarks may be registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office.

Trademark

A logo, insignia, or other distinctive sign identifying a company, product, or anything else. A trademark may be registered with a country's patent office and is protected from duplication. An example of a trademark is the unique check mark seen on Nike products. Trademarks are intangible assets because they can help build brand recognition and as such have value.

trademark

A distinctive proprietary emblem, insignia, or name that identifies a particular product or service. A trademark is an intangible asset that may be protected from use by others.
References in periodicals archive ?
In this crisis period, the EU has good reason to attach importance to its trade marks: 48% of its exports are upscale goods with known trade marks.
Ms Bearfield added that foreign companies had traditionally encountered difficulty enforcing their trade mark rights in China.
The trade mark is due for registration in April 2012.
Council Trade Mark Regulation (EC) No 207/2009 of February 26 2009 (OJ 2009 L 78, p.
Registering a trade mark costs money and you need to get it right, however it establishes in law that your mark is a trade mark and belongs to you alone.
uk or ltd to an otherwise identical already registered trade mark.
He said: "When registering the brand name, HReSOURCE, as a UK trade mark, we came upon the issue of conflicting registered trade marks.
A brand name that is distinctive (and not descriptive of your products) is much easier to protect through obtaining a registered trade mark, and often becomes more recognisable because of its originality (for example "Apple" to describe computers/mobile phones or "Orange" to describe a telecoms network).
He is a hugely talented trade mark attorney whose experience speaks for itself.
Now Forresters has chosen to support Angel and her business by providing free trade mark and copyright advice.
Foreign brand owners are encouraged to register their trade marks lest they be hijacked by their OEMs or third parties even though their products are never intended for sale in China.