Trademark

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Trademark

A distinctive name or symbol used to identify a product or company and build recognition. Trademarks may be registered with the US Patent and Trademark Office.

Trademark

A logo, insignia, or other distinctive sign identifying a company, product, or anything else. A trademark may be registered with a country's patent office and is protected from duplication. An example of a trademark is the unique check mark seen on Nike products. Trademarks are intangible assets because they can help build brand recognition and as such have value.

trademark

A distinctive proprietary emblem, insignia, or name that identifies a particular product or service. A trademark is an intangible asset that may be protected from use by others.
References in periodicals archive ?
Ms Cruse explained: "Brands are increasingly seen as a valuable asset and we strongly recommend that business owners protect their name and logo by registering their trade mark - good business management includes an IP plan.
Other examples include memorable logos, jingles, taglines, colour or even potentially movement marks (such as Bradford & Bingley's UK trade mark registration for the movement of two gentlemen raising their bowler hats).
com), the Uniform Dispute Resolution Process is a cost-effective way of dealing with abusive registrations that infringe trade mark rights.
Further, it supported the BoA's finding that, in fact, it was only the stylised 'F1' element of the F1 Logotype that was perceived by the public to be the opponent's trade mark in relation to its commercial activities in the field of Formula One motor racing.
Registering a trade mark costs money and you need to get it right, however it establishes in law that your mark is a trade mark and belongs to you alone.
Official sponsors are paying for the right to be associated and can legally use the trade marks under licence in their own promotions, in return for payment of significant sums of money for the privilege.
Liverpool FC defended the move saying that it was only seeking to trade mark its own version of the Liverbird because the club is losing a "substantial amount of money" each year due to counterfeit merchandise.
If expanding into other countries, the business should seek to register the logos as trademarks in those countries and consider whether any translated text should be registered, for example a Community Trade Mark offers protection in the EU.
YOU can register your trade mark Europe-wide for 10 years and renew it at the end of that period.
Arsenal failed in its claim that a sportswear trader selling scarves, hats and shirts bearing the club's name and logos was using them as trade marks and was guilty of trade mark infringement.
These are the new Trade Marks Act, the Layout-Designs (Topographies) Act, as well as a bill to amend the Copyright Act to extend its coverage to include databases as well as the issue of trading in encrypted transmissions: