Guild

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Guild

An association of persons with a particular skill or trade. For example, the electricians in an area may form a guild for mutual support, to route business to each other, or for other reasons. A guild contrasts with a union primarily because it includes both employers and employees; it is based on trade, rather than class. Guilds were most common in medieval Europe, but still exist and have a great deal of sway in some industries, notably filmmaking. Bar associations of lawyers and realtor groups may also be considered guilds.
References in periodicals archive ?
Contacts For further information, Fine Art Trade Guild 0207 381 6616
Mary Ann has also been named "top living female artist in print" by the Fine Art Trade Guild.
Members of the Fine Art Trade Guild representing galleries throughout Britain, have voted her the top selfpublished female artist in print, which no mean accolade.
Mary Ann Rogers, recently voted top living female artist in print by Fine Art Trade Guild, is an artist who revels in her chosen medium ( watercolour.
At this time the large county towns which surrounded Birmingham like Worcester, Warwick, Stafford and Shrewsbury were closed cities - their trade guilds stopping newcomers making a living - and growth therefore discouraged.
Their trade guilds stopped newcomers making a living and growth was prevented and discouraged.
And it was quite noteworthy that attending the Khartoum meeting were representatives of state establishments, public and private corporations and trade guilds.
We'd stumbled on Sechselauten, a festival where trade guilds mark the end of winter by marching around, playing brass band music and setting bonfires -fires which are often topped by models of snowmen packed with explosive heads.
Long assumed to be some sort of fire-fighting organizations, she argues that they were instead trade guilds made up predominantly of textile workers.
In the cities and towns where civic government had to compete against powerful ecclesiastical establishments or where religious rather than trade guilds dominated, cyclic drama does not seem to have appeared; instead, processions, fairly unelaborate dramas, and other quasi-dramatic activities seem to have been the norm.
Historians have long recognized that trade guilds and religious confraternities were an especially important facet of life in medieval and Renaissance cities of all sizes.