tract

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tract

A parcel of real estate; usually refers to a large area of land.

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4) There is a handful of comparative studies on Rabbinical Judaism and Confucianism Among them, those most related to the present essay are Rend Goldman, "Moral Leadership in Society: Some Parallels between the Confucian 'Nobleman' and the Jewish Zaddik," Philosophy East and West 45 (July, 1995): 329-365; Robert Eliott Allinson, "Hillel and Confucius: The Proscriptive Formulation of the Golden Rule in the Jewish and Chinese Confucian Ethical Traditions," Dao: A Journal of Comparative Philosophy 3 (Winter, 2003): 29-41; a Chinese translation of the tractate "Avoth," with an introduction by Rabbi Adin Steinsaltz, tr.
The editor of Boethius's Consolation of Philosophy referred to in this article is the bilingual Loeb Classical Library edition, titled Boethius: The Theological Tractates and the Consolation of Philosophy, ed.
The observation made by Kutscher (1976: 58) concerning the fact that the construction kd + participle does not exist in Galilean Aramaic, but that it is used in the BT in the non-standard tractates and the speech of Aramaic Amoraim and thus reflects a supra-dialectal language is not correct.
Mirrors" (specula), exhortatory and exemplary guides, multiplied in every vernacular language, turning not just on devotions or virtues but on social types, that is, what was expected of the prince, the merchant, the recluse, and so on, offering, as the survey of these tractates in Dutch puts it, ideal images and the stuff for self-reflection.
They are the ones who are generally associated with fornication, as evidenced by the subject matter of this very tractate, the sotah or wayward wife.
2; Tractates on the Gospel of John 55-111, The Fathers of the Church 90, trans.
In fact, the only pagan text known so far in which homoousios is used in the context of a discussion specifically and exclusively concerned with the nature of God and his cosmogonic activity is the Poimandres, the first tractate of the Corpus Hermeticum.
One motif that recurs throughout the discussion found on pages 28a-45b of the tractate is a principle discussed in the Mishnah.
Having produced translations and studies of the four principle documents of formative Judaism, Neusner (theology, Bard College) set out to follow single tractates though them.
Not having tractates from the period that speak about ordinary Italian Catholics, he had to assemble a mosaic-like picture using small bits of information garnered from farflung sources.
It should be pointed out that in the late tractates of the Babylonian Talmud (Nedarim, Nazir, Tamid, Kerithoth, Me'ilah, Tamid), which are mainly written in Standard Literary Babylonian Aramaic, similar to the language of the Geonim, and are nearly identical to Targumic Aramaic, the augmented forms do not occur.
Augustine, Tractates on the Gospel of John, 11-27, trans.