Tokugawa Currency

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Related to Tokugawa: Tokugawa Ieyasu

Tokugawa Currency

A gold, silver and bronze coin system that served as Japan's currency between 1601 and 1867. Originally used for international trade, export of Tokugawa coins was eventually restricted because of the scarcity of precious metals in Japan. See also: Japanese yen.
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Furthermore, in the Tokugawa period, some daimyo domains, particularly in the north, came to rely on raising horses for a significant portion of their revenue.
At the outset Platt endorses the invaluable contributions of studies such as those of Ronald Dore and Herbert Passim, but demonstrates how, because they speak largely with the conceptual limitations of consensus, they offer little scope for understanding either the complexity of the processes through which schooling developed in the final century of the Tokugawa era , or the nature of the relationships which obtained between established local arrangements, key actors and the newly centralized order.
In 1612, the Tokugawa government definitively prohibited Christianity.
As its core, the Hosa Library houses the former collection of the Owari Tokugawa family, who had close ties with the Tokugawa Shogunate.
66 Male Colors: The Construction of Male Homosexuality in Tokugawa Japan by Gary P.
The film, based on Jiro Asada's best-selling novel, depicts the story of a man who joins an elite corps of samurai during the chaotic period in the last days of the Tokugawa shogunate in the 19th century and fights for love of his wife and children.
The ambitions of the youths, however, were crushed by the establishment of the Tokugawa Shogunate by the serious and sedate figure of Tokugawa Ieyasu in 1603.
For centuries real power had been in the hands of the sei-i-tai shogun--the barbarian-conquering generalissimos--and Adams landed at a time when the Tokugawa family were jostling for the shogunate, which they were to hold for 300 years.
The examples he wants us to follow, however, involve a pair of backward autocracies--15th-century Ming China and 17th-century Tokugawa Japan--and the contemporary Amish, an example that actually undermines his argument.
Nihombashi Bridge was built in 1603, the year Tokugawa Ieyasu set up the shogunate in Edo, now Tokyo, and was designated as the starting point of Japan's five main roads, such as the Tokaido.
Confucianism began to exert its influence in Japan as early as the fourth century, but before the seventeenth century, the Tokugawa period (1603-1868), Confucianism never assumed a dominant position in Japan's cultural life.
They said the service features advice by Napoleon, warlord Tokugawa Ieyasu, who founded the Tokugawa shogunate, novelist Osamu Dazai, and Sugawara Michizane, a ninth-century academic, poet and politician who is the patron saint of Japanese students and scholars.