Tithe


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Tithe

Ten percent of one's income or production donated to a religious institution. Historically, one could pay a tithe in cash or in kind. In a few jurisdictions, tithes are enforced by law. More broadly, a tithe may refer to a religious donation, even if it is less than 10% of one's income.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tithe maps are maps of Welsh parishes or townships which were prepared following the Tithe Communication Act 1836, which allowed tithes to be paid in cash rather than goods.
Now the National Library is calling for people to get involved in its Cynefin: Mapping Wales' Sense of Place project, which aims to digitise the maps to create a unified tithe map of Wales, available to the public as an online research tool.
Four $2,500 tithes were given to Nativity School: Worcester, Father Rick Frechette's Haiti Mission, The Priest's Retirement Fund in the Diocese of Worcester, and Urban Missionaries of Our Lady of Hope.
Fuchs One Stop Shop displayed never-say-die attitude in this final game as Java Tithe also played offense well in the whole game.
Well, Tithe Barn in Llangynhafal, near Ruthin can boast many notable past owners including the Bromhead family, famed for their military past in the Boer Wars.
ARCHAEOLOGISTS have uncovered the remains of a medieval tithe barn in Southam.
Easy Tithe and SecureGive are two of the more popular services.
This IRM section states that a minister's tithe will be considered a necessary expense if it is a condition of employment.
IT WAS 1524 and powerful Liverpool baron Sir William Molyneux decided to build a tithe barn in the fledgling port.
Mormons tithe 10 percent of their income to the church, and the presidential hopeful doesn't think it's the country's business to know how much he forks over.
Every now and then, one of the boys will want to keep his tithe.