Tinkhundla


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Tinkhundla

In Swaziland, a political subdivision roughly equivalent to a county.
References in periodicals archive ?
This follows the eventual sanctioning of a water project that will draw water from the Jozini Dam and bring it to the homesteads in three Tinkhundla centres.
Administrative subdivisions: 4 regions, 9 municipal governments, and 55 tinkhundla centers (traditional administrative units).
Parallel to the government structure is the traditional system consisting of the king and his advisers, traditional courts, 55 tinkhundla (sub regional districts in which traditional chiefs are grouped), and approximately 360 chiefdoms.
States the Constitution, "The system of government is a democratic, participatory, tinkhundla-based system, which emphasizes devolution of state power from central government to tinkhundla areas and individual merit as a basis for election or appointment to public office.
With no political parties for affiliation, candidates seeking votes from the 55 national constituencies, called Tinkhundla, will present lists of community improvements, from promises of new clinics and roads to employment-generating schemes.
This structure incorporates the system known as Tinkhundla and allows the people to elect parliamentary representatives for specific constituencies.
During recent years, a general feeling has emerged that the system should be reviewed to create a more democratic climate and in 1992, the first 'vusela' (literally meaning 'greet') was held to seek public opinion on how the Tinkhundla should be revised.
The SFTU, on its own part, is determined to back campaigning for the overthrow of King Mswati's non-party Tinkhundla (traditional chieftaincy councils) system of government.
Five years later, parliament was reinstated and indirect elections on a non-party basis were held, underpinned by the Tinkhundla (traditional chieftaincy councils) which preserved the royal control of executive and legislative processes.
But the elections of November 1987 seemed to perpetuate the problem, mainly because in the indirect electoral system of the Tinkhundla, the chiefs appointed deputies at their discretion.
Swaziland s credentials were questioned because the country practices Tinkhundla a non-political party system where positions are filled on merit, not popular votes.
Parallel to the government structure is the traditional system consisting of the king and his advisers, traditional courts, 55 tinkhundla (subregional districts in which traditional chiefs are grouped), and 366 chiefdoms.