Tight Credit

Tight Credit

A situation in which it is difficult to find a loan. That is, tight credit occurs when banks are unwilling to part with their money, even on an interim basis. Tight credit may occur during periods of uncertainty or simply during times of high interest rates. See also: Credit Crunch.
References in periodicals archive ?
Tight credit could hurt shipments from India, which is believed to be one of the world's top jewellery exporters.
He added, "Average loan size increased to almost $307,000 in November from roughly $300,000 in October, indicating that builders are having greater success with higher-priced homes and difficulty at the entry level, as first-time buyers continued to face tight credit conditions.
Appraiser Jonathan Miller, who compiled the Douglas Elliman report, said, "Rents are remaining at a high level because of rapidly rising employment and tight credit.
However, increasingly high unemployment, wage cuts, and tight credit conditions continued to weigh on domestic demand.
We're continuing to see a somewhat restrictive mortgage market and with tight credit, it can make it difficult for many buyers.
Our ability to secure additional capital amid weak macro conditions and a tight credit environment speaks to our healthy overall financial position, as well as to the ability of our management team.
Its assessment of the economic challenges we face, including the effects of the on-going crisis in Europe and the persistence of tight credit conditions, will be familiar to many manufacturers in North Wales.
Total investment will drop substantially due to tight credit conditions and persistent negative economic sentiment (while) private consumption is expected to fall," reflecting a drop in purchasing power and rising unemployment.
Low interest rates are indicative of tight credit, said Miller.
Tight credit is one reason home sales have struggled to gain traction.
Construction firms, another major buying force in the past, bought only 8% of the commercial properties, due mainly to the government's tight credit policy and the high property prices, which give them limited leeway for profit making.
Summary: BEIJING -- China said Wednesday it would "fine-tune" its monetary policy at an "appropriate time", raising hopes of a relaxation of tight credit as growth in the world's second largest economy slows.