tick test

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Tick Test

A temporary suspension on trading on a security in which trading is allowed to continue but only in certain directions. For example, if the security is falling dramatically, an exchange may put in place a tick test only allowing trades for a higher or the same price. Likewise, if the security is rising unsustainably, the tick test may only allow lower or the same prices on trades. Tick tests are designed to reduce volatility in the market. See also: Trading curb.

tick test

A test to measure the extent to which a floor trader has stabilized security prices by trading against market trends, such as the extent to which transactions have been made against the trend as measured by purchases on downticks and sales on upticks.
References in periodicals archive ?
Bid and tick tests would require all market participants to retool their systems at significant expense.
Regulation SHO also established a one year pilot that suspended the tick test under Rule 10a-1 for about one third of the stocks in the Russell 3000, for sales in securities in the Russell 1000 index executed after 4:15 P.
35) The SEC then did remove the tick test, with compliance due on July 6, 2007.
The SEC, on the same day that it voted unanimously to repeal the tick test (August 14, 2007), also tightened Regulation SHO in one key respect.
after studying the effects of repealing the tick test, said that "we do not find any evidence that this more aggressive shorting activity destabilizes stock prices in any way, and in fact short sellers seem to be even more important contributors to efficient share prices after the uptick rule is removed.
As noted above, even those emphasizing short selling's benefits indicate that it can increase market volatility, so the sharp rise in volatility in 2007 (see the VIX Volatility Index figure below) emerging almost simultaneously with the repeal of the tick test made short selling a target.
Those defending short selling argued that short sellers exposed financial firms' serious underlying problems, that the market crisis and economic uncertainty had increased volatility, and that any asserted causal link between the repeal of the tick test and increased volatility was spurious.
Legislators, including House Financial Services Chair Barney Frank and Senate Banking Committee Chair Christopher Dodd, called for reinstatement of the tick test, and Senator Ted Kaufman of Delaware introduced a law to that effect.
92) The SEC repealed the tick test at that time, but Credit Suisse argued that there was no causal connection between the two conditions.
The heavy implementation demands also mean it would take a very long time before a new tick test is fully operational in today's markets, much longer than the SEC's proposed 3 month implementation period.
1994) and a 10 per cent ethanolic solution (w/w) was used in the tick tests.