Threat of Condemnation

Threat of Condemnation

When a property owner is informed, either orally or in writing, by a representative of a governmental body or by a public official authorized to acquire property for public use, that a decision has been made to acquire his property, and it is reasonable to believe that the property will be taken, a threat of condemnation exists.
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Their property is being taken under the threat of condemnation.
Property may be acquired through eminent domain (condemnation) proceedings, by sale under threat of condemnation, or by negotiated sale where the power of eminent domain does not exist.
But the blight label means MVP can force even the owners of well-maintained homes and businesses in the neighborhood to sell under the threat of condemnation.
That approval sparked protests from LNG opponents - and from many property owners who lived along the pipeline route whose titles were clouded by the threat of condemnation proceedings and who were fearful of potential environmental damage from the project.
But with the threat of condemnation in the background, they may at least be brought to the bargaining table.
Generally the threat of condemnation, putting a work on the Index of prohibited books, was enough to elicit a craven apology and submission.
Chicago has acquired more than 400 homes and businesses under the threat of condemnation, which is allowed under unparalleled powers granted to it by a politically cowed Legislature under the O'Hare Modernization Act.
As an institution, religion tends to promote "blessed assurance as insurance" against the threat of condemnation.
This article provides a general overview of how federal tax law treats a gain realized from a condemnation proceeding or settlement reached under threat of condemnation.
Condemnation blight generally refers to the detrimental impact on property caused by the threat of condemnation or by delays between the time the condemnor announces a proposed acquisition and the time the actual taking occurs.
After years of holding out for a better real estate agreement, company officials one day found themselves faced with the city's right of eminent domain, and the threat of condemnation of the 105-year-old facility.
In 1990, a taxpayer sold business property under a threat of condemnation by a redevelopment authority.

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