Thirty-Year Treasury

Thirty-Year Treasury

A debt security backed by the full faith and credit of the United States government with a maturity of 30 years. They may be purchased directly from the government or from a bank; they have coupon payments payable every six months. Thirty-year Treasury bonds may be bought competitively or non-competitively. In a non-competitive transaction, one takes the interest rate he/she is given on a T-bond. In competitive investing, one bids on a desired yield, but this does not mean it will be accepted. Treasury bonds are low-risk, low-return investments. The minimum purchase is $1,000, and the maximum is $5 million in non-competitive bidding or 35% of the offering in competitive bidding. They are known informally as T-bonds. See also: Treasury bill, Treasury note.
References in periodicals archive ?
Thirty-year Treasury bonds were trading with a yield of 2.
That means that a thirty-year Treasury bond had jumped in price by more than 15 percent.
The market itself is a product of short-term forces (even though the market has some long-term indicators, such as the thirty-year Treasury yield), and is most likely to respond to (or anticipate) recent economic news.
Over the quarter, the two-year Treasury yield declined 92 basis points while the yield on the thirty-year bond was nearly unchanged, bringing the spread between the two- and thirty-year Treasury yields to 126 basis points.
375% thirty-year Treasury security due February 2031.
At the same time, thirty-year Treasury bonds actually declined in yield by forty-five basis points, implying monetary conditions as measured out the yield curve were actually less restrictive.
Figure 6 plots the yield spread between the thirty-year Treasury bond and the ten-year Treasury note.
As of mid-January 2000, the Thirty-Year Treasury yield experienced a 52-week range increase of 163 basis points.
The thirty-year Treasury bond is no longer the lead contract for the U.
Over the same period, the yields on the two-year Treasury note and thirty-year Treasury bond fell 76 and 24 basis points, respectively, leading the two- to thirty-year coupon curve to return to a positive spread for the first time since January 2000.
The buy-back program had a dramatic impact on the financial sector, significantly reducing liquidity in the market for thirty-year Treasury bonds.
062 percent for dollar-pound transactions--roughly the size of the spread on a thirty-year Treasury bond.