Entropy

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Related to Thermodynamic entropy: second law of thermodynamics

Entropy

The level of disorder in a system.

Entropy

Disorder in any system. It is the opposite of efficiency.
References in periodicals archive ?
It follows that high thermodynamic entropy signifies the inability of a system to compensate the disturbances and so (i) the system might disintegrate, or (ii) the system might select (if that is feasible) a scenario of isolation, trying to reduce the information it receives, and thus, narrowing its horizon of meaning.
Irreversible local effects of thermodynamic entropy occur when small local disturbances change the equilibrium of London's everyday events, bringing about three deaths that would not have otherwise occurred except for this cascade of events.
Even among the familiar statistical mechanical entropies those named after Boltzmann/Planck and Gibbs respectively are not necessarily equal to each other and neither do they exhibit quite the same behaviour as the thermodynamic entropy (Penrose [1970]).
But more important, from a functional perspective information is not equivalent either to thermodynamic entropy or "negative entropy" (order).
There is skepticism about some biological usage of the entropy concept, such as blurring the distinction between Shannon's entropy and thermodynamic entropy (see Corning and Kline, 1998a, p.
23] joules per kelvin: `This is an important figure, the smallest thermodynamic entropy change that can be associated with a measurement yielding one bit of information' (Tribus and McIrvine, 1971, p.
In any case, thermodynamic entropy as defined by these pioneers is a `state' function, comparable to temperature or pressure.
In fact, Georgesen-Roegen identifies the advent of the study of thermodynamic entropy with economics.