Peso

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Peso

The name of several currencies. The word originated as the Spanish term for a large, silver coin common in international trade in the 16th century. It is currently the name of currencies in several former colonies of Spain, particularly in Latin America. See also: Mexican peso.
References in periodicals archive ?
If you look back at 2008, we saw not only the peso, but pretty much all emerging currencies, depreciate against the dollar in the wake of the financial crisis," he said.
Besides, the factors pumping up the peso may shift.
The decline in the US currency's exchange rate against the peso is not solely the result of the improving value of the peso but rather reflects the overall weakening of US currency.
It is a good time to look forward to because as an indicator, the peso's performance against the dollar has simply been stupendous,'' President Gloria Macapagal-Arroyo said, even calling the peso the ''best performing currency in the world.
The IDB then gives those pesos to the investment bank, which then uses the currency exchange derivative markets to change the pesos back into dollars.
One said he expected the peso weakness to last until September and projected a low of 54.
Over 99% of debt outstanding at March 31, 1996 was dollar-denominated and unhedged against further potential devaluations of the peso.
For example, when the peso crisis erupted in December 1994, Mexican commercial banks had about $4 billion in certificates of deposit outstanding to nonresidents; an overwhelming proportion of those deposits had been placed or brokered by foreign financial institutions.
However, while the peso appears to be stabilizing, the country's high inflation - estimated at 42 percent in 1995 (presently among the highest in all of Latin America) - could lead to another round of devaluation, according to some economic forecasts.
The money made through those higher rates often offset any principal loses caused b a declining value of the peso principal loses caused by a declining value of the peso against the dollar.
1% in 2009 as a result of a better pricing environment in cement and the depreciation of the peso against the dollar.
The peso now trades at 24 to the dollar, up from 26 to the dollar before.

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