glass ceiling

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Glass Ceiling

A situation in which a person cannot advance in an organization because of real or perceived sexism, racism or some other form of discrimination. For example, very few CEOs in the United States are women; this fact forms a glass ceiling for women in business. Glass ceilings are usually illegal but are difficult to prosecute because choosing one candidate over another is often unquantifiable.

glass ceiling

the impenetrable yet invisible barrier which prevents most women from reaching senior management positions, despite attempts to tackle DISCRIMINATION in employment over the last twenty-five years. The glass ceiling exists because male senior managers tend to believe that the values and talents necessary for senior management positions are more likely to be found in men. In other words male managers recruit new managers in their own image.
References in periodicals archive ?
After remarking that the United States is the only leading modern country in which a woman has not been nominated for or held the office of president, Fuchs said that as women reach positions of power, they don't realize the glass ceiling is there "until we bump into it.
The proposition argued that the glass ceiling is a matter of psychological barrier rather than a reality and that women create the glass ceiling for themselves and in order to overcome it they must believe that it does not exist.
Oakley (2000) lists the glass ceiling barriers as including: lack of line management experience; inadequate career opportunities; gender differences in socialization and linguistic styles; gender-based stereotypes; the old boy network persisting at the top of organizations; and tokenism.
Clearly, the glass ceiling that hinders women's advancement to senior-level casino management is still intact.
Less commonly talked about, but maybe of greater importance, is the domestic one - the glass ceiling at home that prevents women from reaching their full potential.
The glass ceiling represents a "metaphorical barrier preventing women from rising to the highest organizational levels (Daily and Dalton, 1999, p.
The private sector could do well to look at how local councils are trying to break through the glass ceiling.
The glass ceiling facing women in business is a barrier mostly in the mind of the beholder, say a number of Colorado women CEOs who have shattered the glass.
Today, we talk about the glass ceiling that exists for top black corporate executives, Aunt Freddie broke the glass ceiling just by getting accepted to Hunter.
The glass ceiling is a lot thinner than it was in 1969 when I began my career as an educator.
Since the term was popularized in the 1980s, the glass ceiling has become a significant concept in the American workplace.
At the very top, the glass ceiling is still largely in place.