Audience

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Audience

1. The persons who watch, listen to, or read a medium such as a television show or a magazine, or who are likely to do so.

2. The persons who are the targets of an advertising campaign, or the persons who have actually been exposed to it.
References in classic literature ?
somebody yelled, and the audience laughed loudly in its relief.
The one member of the audience who looked at her and listened to her coldly, was her elder sister.
Summerlee, the veteran Professor of Comparative Anatomy, rose among the audience, a tall, thin, bitter man, with the withered aspect of a theologian.
Tom began -- hesitatingly at first, but as he warmed to his subject his words flowed more and more easily; in a little while every sound ceased but his own voice; every eye fixed itself upon him; with parted lips and bated breath the audience hung upon his words, taking no note of time, rapt in the ghastly fascinations of the tale.
His cortege--what we should nowadays call his staff--of bishops and abbés invaded the estrade in his train, not without causing redoubled tumult and curiosity among the audience.
It was a heart-rending spectacle, but the audience, seeing that the play had stopped, became angry and began to yell:
It chanced that a cub reporter sat in the audience, detailed there on a day dull of news and impressed by the urgent need of journalism for sensation.
After a brief interval of delay there was a sudden commotion among the audience, accompanied by suppressed exclamations of curiosity and surprise.
When the audience recognized these familiar mementos of Pudd'nhead's old time childish "puttering" and folly, the tense and funereal interest vanished out of their faces, and the house burst into volleys of relieving and refreshing laughter, and Tom chirked up and joined in the fun himself; but Wilson was apparently not disturbed.
When the audience was stationary, the common people stood in the square on all sides of the stage, while persons of higher rank or greater means were seated on temporary wooden scaffolds or looked down from the windows of the adjacent houses.
The audience laughed, but next day, sure enough, the Countryman appeared on the stage, and putting his head down squealed so hideously that the spectators hissed and threw stones at him to make him stop.
The gruff tones of Hugo's voice, with an occasional shout when his feelings overcame him, were very impressive, and the audience applauded the moment he paused for breath.

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