AIDS

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AIDS

Acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. Persons who are HIV-positive, or who have AIDS, are protected from discrimination by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other federal and state legislation. This extends to decisions to buy, rent, or sell. Further, in many states it is considered a violation of privacy to reveal that a former tenant or owner was HIV-positive or suffered from AIDS.

References in periodicals archive ?
The Bush Administration's clumsy act of announcing that it was closing both the office on AIDS policy and the office on race relations on February 7, then hastily rescinding that decision on the same day, does not bode well--particularly since the Administration made those announcements the day after newspapers revealed that the AIDS rate was surging among black and Latino gay men in the United States.
Jennifer Flynn of the AIDS Housing Network notes that Latino and black men were the first people of color to show high incidences of HIV/AIDS infections.
In March in New York City the AIDS Coalition to Unleash Power holds its first protest.
It needed a guy who understood mobilizing and organization to put those skills to work and to put the AIDS issue on the map.
Over the past years, however, the AIDS crisis in Africa has worsened to catastrophic levels, with little being done to arrest the progress of the disease there because many in the affluent world, as A.
in response to a Mayoral nominee who told the media that his solution to the AIDS problem would be to "shoot the queers.
c Illiterate people cannot read warnings about the AIDS threat.
Faced with this tragedy, the Catholic Church in Africa is waging a spirited fight to contain the AIDS scourge in the continent.
Note: The list below does not include most meetings designed primarily as continuing medical education (CME) training for medical professionals--some of which, like those of the AIDS Education and Training Centers (AETCs), we highly recommend.
A medical anthropologist-demographer who has worked on the AIDS epidemic in 24 countries for the past 15 years, Hunter offers a brilliant examination of the AIDS pandemic--past, present and frightening future.
Several insurers are now taking a hard look at the AIDS pandemic and trying to reach out to those infected with the disease and their families.
As if to outdo himself, President Bush last year announced another new aid program: $10 billion over five years to combat the AIDS pandemic in Tanzania and 13 other poor countries in Africa and the Caribbean, roughly quadrupling current U.