Picture

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Picture

Describes bid and asked prices a broker quotes for a given security. Used for listed equity securities. Bid and ask prices and quantity information from a specialist or from a dealer regarding a particular security (i.e., "IBM's 1/4 to 1/2, 5m by 10m").

Picture

In equities, the price at which a dealer or broker is willing to buy or sell a security. See also: Bid-ask spread.

picture

The bid and ask price at which a dealer is willing to buy or sell a security.
References in classic literature ?
Not that we knew anything about him on Tuesday last; we didn't even know for certain that young Debenham had stolen the picture.
And disengaging a couple of chairs from the artistical lumber that usurped them, she bid us be seated, and resumed her place beside the easel - not facing it exactly, but now and then glancing at the picture upon it while she conversed, and giving it an occasional touch with her brush, as if she found it impossible to wean her attention entirely from her occupation to fix it upon her guests.
Anyway he had seen the picture and if he was not a friend he could tell The Sheik about it and it would be taken away from her.
He looked at Newman from head to foot; he looked at his daughter and then at the picture.
Be so good as to write to Christie's for me, and ask them to send down a valuer to go through the pictures.
Wild as the picture might be in its conception, there was a suggestive power in it which I confess strongly impressed me.
A general glance at the picture could never suggest that there was a hair trunk in it; the Hair Trunk is not mentioned in the title even--which is, "Pope Alexander III.
But observing her uncle's steadfast gaze, which appeared to search through the mist of years to discover the subject of the picture, her curiosity was excited.
asked Vronsky, thinking that, as a Russian Maecenas, it was his duty to assist the artist regardless of whether the picture were good or bad.
One was a woman in a slim black dress, belted small under the armpits, with bulges like a cabbage in the middle of the sleeves, and a large black scoop-shovel bonnet with a black veil, and white slim ankles crossed about with black tape, and very wee black slippers, like a chisel, and she was leaning pensive on a tombstone on her right elbow, under a weeping willow, and her other hand hanging down her side holding a white handkerchief and a reticule, and underneath the picture it said "Shall I Never See Thee More Alas.
Sitka Charley looked at me in swift surprise, then back at the picture.
Why can't you bring the picture down to the carriage, Frank?